The History of the Delco-Remy Divsion of General Motors
A.K.A. "The Remy Brothers" or "The Remy Electric Company"
1896-1994
Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   World War Two Products and Product Applications    The Army-Navy "E" Award   Our War Job

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Ypsilanti Automotive Heritage Museum - Ypsilanti, MI

Another great museum to find rare Delco-Remy components on different engines.

As soon as one walks in, pays his/hers admission fee and then turns and walks to the left into the next room, on the left is a WWII Hudson Invader 168 Marine Engine with Delco-Remy starter, DC generator and distributor.  One can see the DR ID Tag on the starter as they walk up to the engine.
 
I have a hard time believing that this 250 hp engine was used as a replacement in PT boats which had Packard V-12 engines producing 1,200 hp with upgrades to 1,500 hp.  Several Hudson sources mention this but there is not the needed power produced and they would not mount the same.  I think this is an "old wives" tale that has taken on a life of its own within the Hudson enthusiast community.  There were three engines in a PT boat and if the Invader had been used in an outboard engine it would have caused steering problems.  Also, the top speed and the survivability of the PT boat in combat would be severely reduced.
 
 
The DR ID tag has been painted over by an over enthusiast volunteer.  The curator of the Museum said he would take some paint remover to this and remove the upper layer of paint.  Time will tell if that actually happens.
 

Here is an Invader Engine coming off the WWII Hudson Engine Line with the Delco-Remy Heavy Duty Starter and Solenoid prominently shown.
 
A front view of the Invader 168 with the Delco-Remy distributor to the right.
 
 
 
 
 
Delco-Remy distributor model 4242, serial number 8204.  DR would have supplied 4,000 of the model 4242 to Hudson in Detroit, MI during the war.
 
One has to assume DC generator is also a DR unit even though the ID tag can not be seen.
 
 
The museum has many items in it from the closed GM Willow Run Transmission Plant a mile to the east.
 
This display came from Willow Run and was the first vehicle to use the Hydramatic Transmission.  However, there are a couple of Delco-Remy components on it.
 
The Delco Battery.
 
Note the placement on the frame rail.
 
One can assume this is a DR distributor even though there is no marking on it.  GM usually removes any names off of components on its display models like this.  It is surprising the Delco Battery was allowed to be identified, although it is more difficult to sanitize the name.
 
Delco-Remy 12 Volt DC Generator.  Both the generator and the starter below have the sheet metal straps around the end to enable service of the brushes. 
 
Delco-Remy foot activated starter.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Also on display from the former transmission plant, which started its life in 1941 as the Ford B-24 Bomber Plant, is this 1973 Rotary Engine.  Right in front is its Delcotron.
 
This interesting photos shows an early six cylinder HEI with two coils. 
 
 
 
The next series of photos of are of a cut away display of a turbo charged Chevrolet Corvair.  Most of the Corvairs that were built were assembled at the former Willow Run Assembly plant near the transmission plant.  There are no markings on the Delco-Remy due to the nature of the display but it does give a good opportunity to view the internal components.  Also, this is all inside a Plexiglas display so the photos look a little fuzzy and has some reflections.
 
 DC Generator.
 
Distributor and Coil.
 
Engineare on display with components from other Allied Divisions.  I am not quite sure why the Harrison AC compressor is included as it was never, even during the Delphi era in Flint, managed or associated with the old AC Division.
 
 
 

 
 

 

 

Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   World War Two Products and Product Applications   The Army-Navy "E" Award   Our War Job
Home  History   The Plants   Plant Photos   Moments in Time  The Products   Product Brochures   Service Manuals   Training Booklets   Video  Employment Numbers   Museums   Sources  Allied Divisions   Revisions   Reunions   Remy Electric Country Club   Vintage Literature about The Remy Electric Company   Links

This Website has no affiliation with General Motors, Delphi Holdings, Remy International, or Borg-Warner.  The content is to only present a historical perspective of the plants and products of the former Delco-Remy Division previous to 1994.  All content
presented on this website is for general information only.   Website designed and maintained by David D Jackson.  
Contact:  David D Jackson