The History of the Delco-Remy Divsion of General Motors
A.K.A. "The Remy Brothers" or "The Remy Electric Company"
1896-1994
Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   World War Two Products and Product Applications   The Army-Navy "E" for Excellence Award   Our War Job

Home  History   The Plants   Plant Photos   Moments in Time  The Products   Product Brochures   Service Manuals   Training Booklets   Video  Employment Numbers   Museums   Sources  Allied Divisions   Revisions   Reunions   Remy Electric Country Club   Vintage Literature about The Remy Electric Company   Links

 

Air Force Museum   America's Packard Museum    Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum   Buick Museum   Chrysler Museum   Gilmore Car Museum   Kansas Aviation Museum   Kokomo Auto Museum   Michigan Firehouse Museum   Museum of Flight   National Automobile and Truck Museum    National Packard Museum   Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust Allison Branch  RE Olds Transportation Museum   Ropkey Armor Museum   Studebaker Museum   USS Alabama Aviation Museum   War in the Pacific Museum   Ypsilanti Automotive Heritage Museum

Kansas Aviation Museum - Wichita, KS

Wichita, KS is the general aviation capital of the world.  Names like Clyde Cessna, Walter Beech and Lloyd Stearman are almost synonymous with this city starting in the 1930s and continuing today. I was surprised but delighted to see that Delco-Remy was represented among the engine displays.  The DR ID makes the identification easy.


This Continental GO-300-A aircraft engine has a Delco-Remy 12 volt Starter.  A DC Generator model number 1101876 or 1101898 would have also come on this engine. Both the starter and generator were based on the DR automotive starters.


According to FAA records, there are in 2011 still (823) Cessna 175, (371) Cessna 175A, (135) Cessna 175B and (64) Cessna 175C aircraft still registered and flyable.  The 175 used the GO-300-A engine pictured here while the A and B models used a C version and the C model used E version of the engine.  One can only assume that DR supplied the starter to all the 2,106 variants built between 1958 and 1962. How many are still operational after 50 years is questionable as there are conversion packages that provide lighter starters while the DC generators have been replaced with alternators..  But visitors will see the DR starter for as long as the museum exists with this engine display.

Model Number 1109677, Serial Number 704.  What is interesting in searching the literature this is not one of the starters that should have been on this engine.  DR starters that could be used were:  1109471, 1109681, 1109684, 1108249, 646275, and 1108234.
 

Note the aviation safety wire on the back.
 

 
 

Aircraft engines have two sparkplugs per cylinder.  In this case the DR eight cylinder distributor provided ignition to the four cylinder engine.
 
 
 
Engineering Sample Model X20010 Serial Number 9XJ.
 
 
 

The Franklin Engine appears to have a Delco-Remy starter on it.  From the photos below one can see that the ID tag has the traditional DR oval but most of the information has been worn off.
 
 

  The serial number is 2182.  This information is consistent with the standard Delco-Remy ID tag.
 

 

 

Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   World War Two Products and Product Applications   The Army-Navy "E" for Excellence Award   Our War Job
Home  History   The Plants   Plant Photos   Moments in Time  The Products   Product Brochures   Service Manuals   Training Booklets   Video  Employment Numbers   Museums   Sources  Allied Divisions   Revisions   Reunions   Remy Electric Country Club   Vintage Literature about The Remy Electric Company   Links

This Website has no affiliation with General Motors, Delphi Holdings, Remy International, or Borg-Warner.  The content is to only present a historical perspective of the plants and products of the former Delco-Remy Division previous to 1994.  All content
presented on this website is for general information only.   Website designed and maintained by David D Jackson.  
Contact:  David D Jackson