The History of the Delco-Remy Divsion of General Motors
A.K.A. "The Remy Brothers" or "The Remy Electric Company"
1896-1994
Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   World War Two Products and Product Applications    The Army-Navy "E" Award   Our War Job

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Batteries    Delcotrons    Heated Windshield   Heavy Duty   Horns   Ignition   Magnequench   MISAR   Missile Battery   Propulsion Systems for Electric Vehicles   Regulators    Shock Absorbers  Starters   Switches

Products
Switches

Any reference to switches built by Remy Electric and the later Delco-Remy in either the industry literature or DR histories is lacking.  But as can be from the first five photos Delco-Remy had a long history of building automotive switches.


Photo courtesy of Brian Mulcahy.


1913 Remy Ignition Switch.  Photo courtesy of Brian Mulcahy.


Photo courtesy of Brian Mulcahy.


Photo courtesy of Brian Mulcahy.


Photo courtesy of Brian Mulcahy.


These switches used steel rather than plastic bodies that were prevalent later in the product cycle.  Photo courtesy of Ted Vinson / Madison County Historical Society.



The Push-Pull Light Switch that went on millions and millions and millions of GM Vehicles.  When this was in use one always knew where the light switch in a GM vehicle was.  It was left of the steering column on the dash.  For parking lights you pulled out to the first detent, for headlights you pulled full out.  To adjust the intensity of the lighting in the instrument panel, you just rotated the shaft.  Functional and practical.  On today's they are all different configurations and when in a strange rental car after dark sometimes it gets to be problematic as to whether you can turn on your headlights or find how to adjust the intensity of the light.  Why new is not always better.  A Plant 7 and later Plant 10 product.  Gene Phillips photo.


Column Lock Ignition Switch.  This mounted on the steering column and was activated by a rod that extended back up the column to the lock where the key was inserted.  When the key was turned the rod, which fit into an plastic contact block which then would move horizontal to make proper switch positions:  Start, Run, Off, Accessory.  The rod which was L shaped at the switch end fit into the contact block in the slot shown.  DR made millions of these in Plant 7.   Gene Phillips photo.

 

 

 

Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   World War Two Products and Product Applications   The Army-Navy "E" Award   Our War Job
Home  History   The Plants   Plant Photos   Moments in Time  The Products   Product Brochures   Service Manuals   Training Booklets   Video  Employment Numbers   Museums   Sources  Allied Divisions   Revisions   Reunions   Remy Electric Country Club   Vintage Literature about The Remy Electric Company   Links

This Website has no affiliation with General Motors, Delphi Holdings, Remy International, or Borg-Warner.  The content is to only present a historical perspective of the plants and products of the former Delco-Remy Division previous to 1994.  All content
presented on this website is for general information only.   Website designed and maintained by David D Jackson.  
Contact:  David D Jackson